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Baby Simeon bled to death

By CAROL MATROO Saturday, March 15 2014

The autopsy report for baby Simeon has stated that the primary cause of death was due to shock from bleeding as a result of brain injury which occurred during his mother’s Caesarian-section at Mt Hope Women’s Hospital on March 1.

The report also stated the baby was severely underweight as a result of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), which occurs in mothers who have chronic hypertension, as was the case of his mother. The baby also had underdeveloped lungs as a result of prematurity. The baby had a gestation period of seven months.

The baby’s histology showed his heart, spleen, kidneys and liver were normal but there was bleeding in the brain, congestion in the lungs and the alveoli was collapsed. This meant the baby could not facilitate his own gas exchange or obtain oxygen. The autopsy was done by consultant pathologist Dr Chunilal Ramjit.

The baby’s parents, Quelly Ann Cottle and Emil Millington, received the report at the Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex, Mt Hope, at about 3 pm yesterday.

They arrived with their attorney, Colin Selvon, who, after receiving the report said they had some concerns with certain aspects of the findings. This was after a meeting with Director of Health Dr Rodney Ramroop.

“He helped us to understand what was in the report, and we understand that there were just two major problems with the baby, otherwise he was fine. But, the second part of the report we have some problems with and we want answered properly. Our lawyer said he has someone to do that,” Millington told Newsday last night.

Millington said they also met with the chief executive officer of the North Central Regional Health Authority (NCRHA), Kumar Boodram, where they discussed funeral arrangements and other expenses. The NCRHA has offered to pay for the baby’s funeral.

“He said the funeral home would have to send the bill to him. We were thinking about having the funeral next Tuesday, but we will decide exactly when that will be when we get the second part of the report sorted out,” Millington said. On Thursday, medical sources disclosed baby Simeon lived for just five hours after delivery. During Cottle’s surgery the obstetrician cut too deep into her womb, slicing the baby’s head.

The source said after the baby was born and the obstetrician saw the cut, he referred the baby to a junior paediatric officer who in turn gave the baby to a paediatric surgeon, also a junior doctor, who turned the baby over to a junior neurosurgical doctor.

The source claimed the neurosurgeon decided not to operate on the baby, who continued to bleed from the head wound, and eventually died.

Cottle, in an interview before receiving the report, said it saddened her more to know her baby lived for several hours but she was never able to see him. “I hearing the baby was alive for five hours, this is news to me. So my child was alive for five hours and nobody had even a little sense to come and say they don’t know if the baby would live or die, say at least have a few minutes with the baby.

I never got to hold my child when he was alive,” Cottle told Newsday. “I never saw the baby when the baby was alive, (but) I heard him, I heard him cry.”

A doctor, who spoke with Newsday on condition of anonymity yesterday, explained that while there was no denying the baby did receive a cut to the head, the baby was not healthy.

The doctor said all babies had fontanelles, soft spots or gaps, in their skulls that are not fully fused until they get older.

“This baby was a preemie and somehow, whatever the doctor used during the surgery–scalpel, forceps, fingers–somehow the child’s brain got lacerated. Yes, the result of death was bleeding, but he did not have a good chance to begin with,” the doctor said.

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