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Guy loved his cricket

By Miranda La RosE Tuesday, June 3 2014

click on pic to zoom in
 Justice Guy Hannays...
Justice Guy Hannays...

Former High Court judge Justice William Guy Courtenay Hannays, 60, died doing one of the things he loved — playing cricket.

And, so too, Chief Justice Ivor Archie hopes when his time comes he would dying be doing something he loves.

“Truth be told,” Archie said, “when my time comes, I want to go like Guy, doing one of the things I love most.”

Archie’s remarks brought chuckles from the congregation at Hannay’s funeral service held yesterday at St Theresa’s RC Church in Malick. The packed congregation included Finance Minister Larry Howai, Justice Vasheist Kokaram and Justice Joseph Tam who also paid tribute. Also present was Attorney General Anand Ramlogan.

Reflecting on God’s mission for men like Hannays who have given much and had much more to give, Archie said that at a time like Hannays’ sudden passing he has struggled to find some meaning as to what happened.

Hannays died on May 25 at the St Joseph Recreation Ground while playing cricket for the Trinidad and Tobago Lawyers’ Cricket Association against a team called “Ensure”.

Noting that the local judiciary has suffered a great loss in his passing Archie said he knew three things Hannays loved — his family, his profession and his cricket. A week before his demise, he said they were in Tobago and for some reason they spoke about their spirituality not knowing that he would die shortly after. A stickler for discipline, detail and one who would put in long hours of work, Archie said he remembers Hannays as a very good and decent man with traits so sadly lacking in many professionals. Describing Hannays as a friend and colleague, Howai said he lived life to its fullness. “I respected his high standards. I respected his spirituality,” he said.

They met when Hannays was Chairman of the Board of Directors of First Citizens Bank and he was Chief Executive Officer.

Fifteen years ago, Howai said Hannays gave him a book. At the time he was doing research on spirituality and the psychic ability. Days before Hannays died, he said, “I picked it up.” He questioned whether or not it was coincidence that he picked up the book after 15 years. In his tribute, Tam recalled the day Hannays died was a “rainy day”.

It was not a good day, for cricket, but knowing Hannays, a former president of the West Indies Lawyers Cricket Association, he said no rain could daunt his spirit and enthusiasm. Before Hannays left home that day Tam said he asked his wife Joanne to pick a number. She picked the number “4.” He said to her, “Then that’s how many wickets I will get.”

Hannays got one wicket that day, he said, “but we will never know if he would have gotten the other three, because he still had one more over to bowl.”

As a friend and colleague in both the legal profession and in cricket, Tam said Hannays played the game for four different teams including Ensure which the lawyers were playing against on that fateful day. “Guy had played regularly for both teams. He was therefore surrounded by friends on both sides,” he said adding that Ensure were friends, but the lawyers “were family.”

Hannays was a principled and courageous man who remained true to his principles, he said, “and it did not matter who the offending party was.”

He recalled that in 2009, when in mid-tournament during the second Lawyers World Cup Tournament, the tournament organisers attempted to alter the rules to the detriment of the West Indies. He told the representatives from India, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Ireland, England, New Zealand and Australia that what they were doing was contrary to the rules and conditions that had been agreed on. He said if they went ahead the West Indies would walk away from the tournament. They all backed down.

Also paying tributes were Hannays’ sister Susan Hannays-Abraham, daughter, Christine, and wife Joanne Joseph-Hannays. They remembered him as being generous to a fault, a staunch family man who was not only obedient to his parents but caring and protective of his immediate family and in-laws.

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